Resources

September 21, 2012 - Volume 32 Issue 23

Resources


West Virginia day care providers seeking ways to serve nutritious, healthy meals may qualify for funding through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Child and Adult Care Food Program.

The program, which is administered through the West Virginia Department of Education, offers cash reimbursements for meals served to children. Some facilities may be eligible to receive USDA-donated foods as well.

Children enrolled at childcare centers or other facilities participating in the child and adult care food program receive free meals. The reimbursement rate to providers depends on the number of children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals. Participants may be reimbursed for up to three meal types, including breakfast, lunch, snacks, or supper.

Eligible child care centers are licensed or approved public or private nonprofit facilities. For-profit child care centers also are eligible if they receive compensation under Title XX of the Social Security Act for at least 25 percent of the children enrolled, or if at least 25 percent of the children they serve are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals.

Licensed or registered family day care home providers also may participate in the program under the auspices of an approved family day care sponsoring organization. There are 10 approved sponsors throughout West Virginia. Additionally, homeless shelters providing services for families and after-school programs located in low-income areas also can participate. Program sponsors provide meals at no extra charge to all enrolled participants at each participating facility.

In accordance with federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, an institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability.

To file a complaint alleging discrimination, write: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call, toll free, (866) 632- 9992 (Voice). Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay at (800) 877-8339 or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

For more information, contact the Office of Child Nutrition at (304) 558-3396, or the Office of Communication at (304) 558-2699.

 


By Anne Montague

The West Virginia Rosie the Riveter Project is clearly a model for America. The project is a pride-filled, West Virginia creation that will guide Americans everywhere to learn from living Rosies.  It will teach people into the future what these Rosies, themselves, tell us is valid and important about their critical contributions to America and the free world.    

One of its positive results for West Virginia is that the public, educators and students are extremely interested in learning from these 90-year-old women who shortened World War II, pioneered women in the workplace and today are showing what elderly persons can achieve within their communities. There is a possible negative, however, which is that we West Virginians may not be ready to show off our work in education. Thus, we need your help.

To orient you to the West Virginia Rosie the Riveter Project, the real start came when the Charleston Gazette ran a full-page, color ad on March 29, 2009, that said, “Help us Find Our Rosies” with a photo of Jessie Jacobs Frazier, my mother who inspected lenses at Polan Industries in Huntington during the war. That ad broke the silence. A dozen Rosies responded within two weeks. Each story was fascinating, and, taken together, Rosies’ stories and their pent-up desire to tell what they had done, seen, hoped for and set in motion gave me a strong sense of America and my own place as a citizen. It was my opportunity to know our Rosies, and with that, my responsibility to tell how Rosies are critical players in the American story.  

Today, many others who know our Rosies say they have been enlightened about many aspects of the war, how the women’s movement started, changes in America over 70 years, and issues that our nation is starting to readdress for the future, such as how to conserve limited resources.  In short, the study of Rosies, told by living Rosies, is revealing something profound that has been largely ignored.  

Yet, Rosies’ time on earth is so short.  We have been contacted by about 200 West Virginia Rosies, but with their frequent passing, we have about 130 living Rosies, and only about half of these can participate.  

Our preparedness to launch a National Rosie the Riveter Movement has evolved because we see the need to both act fast and to create visible, well-planned and successful projects (see methods below).  Yet, so far, we do not feel ready to show that West Virginia is a model for quality education about Rosies. We’re close, but we need your help to shine.        

Thus, we appeal to you, as educators, to understand the importance of what we are doing to seize this significant opportunity for education in West Virginia. To start, here are some talking points for you to show that you understand the distinguishing characteristics and successes of Thanks! Plain and Simple’s West Virginia Rosie the Riveter Project. Briefly, we:

Include Rosies in work and decisions -- Our goal is to assure that their own legacy is passed validly to the future. Thus, we interview Rosies, often with the help of oral historians, and we do much more with Rosies, such as hold events with allied nations, develop educational methods, and continually verify fact and meaning with Rosies.

Strive to be a model for America – Our goal is for other communities to be able to quickly replicate, adapt and add to what we have done, so that more and more American Rosies will be inspired and start learning with Rosies simultaneously. Thus, try to continuously improve in West Virginia.  Funding from the Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation since 2009 has allowed us to create the first model Rosie the Riveter Community in America and pioneer projects that help Rosies educate (see photo of first Rosie the Riveter Community Park).

Create many ways to educate with Rosies – Our goal is for people to learn “one way or another” from “hands-on” to “book” learning. Thus, in addition to conducting interviews, we keep adding methods as people contribute new ideas and  actions.  A few examples are:

  • Original Rosie music by West Virginians (see our documentary film and website; ask for CDs);
  • Our highly respected documentary film that includes 31 West Virginia Rosies;
  • Art by students and Rosies (e.g. Blenko Glass and Putnam County students will make faceted-glass windows depicting the work Rosies have done);
  • Naming buildings,  “The Rosie the Riveter Building” (schools will name rooms, too);
  • Quilts designed by Rosies that represents their work;
  • A photographic book Rosies are contributing to (most photos from the Library of Congress);
  • Personal presentations by Rosies to schools, groups, radio talk shows;
  • Interviews of Rosies by students (recorded);
  • A manikin created by Rosies that is displayed at libraries, schools, their presentations;
  • Posters and banners designed by students and Rosies, then signed by Rosies;
  • Photos of Rosies as young women and other memorabilia (e.g. love letters);
  • Lists by Rosies of what they did to conserve;
  • Historic speeches to American Rosies delivered by allied nations in West Virginia at our invitation;
  • Writings and quotations by Rosies;
  • Promotion of STEM by using manuals that Rosies used to building planes and our film;
  • Demonstrations of inspection and quality control on the assembly line;
  • DVDs and CDs of their cooperation, interviews, etc.;
  • Internet education (see Education on our website, www.thanksplainandsimple.org);
  • A park designed with Rosies (first community Rosie the Riveter Park in the U.S.)

Share with other Americans while we continuously improve in West Virginia – A few examples are:

  • NBC’s Today Show chose us as partners to find and tape Rosies for a program that will be aired soon. In two months, we brought them 50 West Virginia Rosies (with photos of them as young women, their bios and their memorabilia) in a bona fide World War II factory (in the stamping plant in South Charleston with the help of American Electric Power who rents space in the unchanged factory). The producer’s compliment of our work is a priceless indication that we are a model.
  • We have been asked by the British Parliament to help it in a unified effort.
  • We have been hosted by groups in Columbia, S.C.; Brunswick, Md.; and East Canton, Ohio; and we will interview Rosies at the Library of Congress in a few weeks.
  • We are partners with the Walter Reuther Library, which is reputed to be best labor history archive in North America, where we may archive our West Virginia Rosie the Riveter collection.
  • Our documentary film, which features 31 West Virginia Rosies, is being used in many states.

Strive to unify West Virginians and our communities – To give America the same message that Rosies were given during the war, “We pull better, when we pull together.”   Remember, no other state in the union has looked for, included and taught with its Rosies.  So even if others do not follow us quickly, West Virginia will always be known for planning and managing this project for Americans to know far more about the importance of these women. 

You should also know that we face dilemmas. For example, we had to choose whether to get all the interviews we could, or to take time to create ways to educate with Rosies.  If we did interviews only, Rosies’ stories would be less known.  If we created other educational projects, such as taking Rosies to schools, we would capture fewer interviews ourselves, and some Rosies would die before we got their stories, but people would be more inspired to get Rosies’ interviews. We have opted to do both the best we can, hoping that we will catch up with a sometimes overwhelming load.

Our next step is to help West Virginia schools to shine. Eighteen months ago, we wrote to state Supt. Jorea Marple that out of her four educational objectives, three (personalized learning, stakeholders taking responsibility and initiatives that elevate teachers) can be advanced when schools are involved with Rosies. We believe we are proving this as schools and Rosies educate together.    

Also, the West Virginia Deparment of Education, with the help of Joey Wiseman and Jack Deskins, has added Rosie the Riveter into content suggestions for World War II  (grades six and 11).   We are now surveying other states’ departments of education to see if, how and where Rosies are included in curricula, and we presented two West Virginia Rosies to South Carolina’s Social Studies Curriculum Committee, which continues to want to learn from us.

What you can do? First, get to know a “Rosie” and be able to speak to the media and others about their importance in past, present and future.
 
Second, help guide us to develop high-quality lesson plans and curricula that withstand scrutiny.

Third, help raise public interest in Rosies as a precious, fast-fading resource that we West Virginians are doing a great job to preserve.

Fourth, help America see Rosies in our schools with our students. Record a good job at a small level, school by school, Rosies by Rosie, teacher by teacher, student by student to make this work part of visible history of Rosies and West Virginians working together.  

Fifth, help us show that we are learning. Encourage people to unite to continuously improve.

Finally, help us speak and act to keep this project’s creativity, unity and standards high.   If the media or a writer or a photographer comes to a school that you assist, be ready to show how to teach about Rosies, and, when possible, include living Rosies.

We at Thanks! Plain and Simple are not formally-trained educators; we must rely on education experts to write lesson plans and to set and meet curriculum standards.  Up to now, we have focused on two ways to educate – first, to get Rosies and students together, and second, to offer an array of tangible, achievable ways to teach.  Now, with national attention coming, there is no better way to show our West Virginia Rosies and work than to create high-quality lesson plans that combine the dynamics of Rosies with facts and methods needed to underpin good education.  

I could share lists with you of what schools have participated, what teachers and students have done to show Rosies and us the value of this work, what ideas have been made real, what delays and negatives have frustrated us most, and what happenings have inspired us and others most.  We must save these lists for another time. For now, let’s concentrate on cooperating to develop standards in teaching about Rosies.

Over and over, we hear that West Virginia is seizing this moment in America to learn about Rosies from Rosies.  I have often said, including on a CD used at funerals of Rosies whom we never got to interview, “We live in the age of communications, but what are we communicating about if we don’t even ask those who contributed most to our freedoms what they did, why, and what it means to America and freedom.”

Some tell us that our work for America was slowed because we refuse to drop “West Virginia” from the project name.  I believe you will help me prove that what I know is true: When authentic and unpretentious people do the job, West Virginians not only can, but will, cooperate to honor and learn from them.   

In that same talk that Supt. Marple gave early last year, she quoted Eleanor Roosevelt: “We gain strength, courage and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face. We must do that which we think we cannot.”

It’s hard for us West Virginians to brag, or to stand up to pushy people, but we have to honor our Rosies as they deserve. Indeed, we are the only state that has unified to honor and learn from our Rosies, and fear of how to honor Rosies in front of a nation is much diminished because the tools we are ready. 

Our next step is to meet educational standards so that West Virginia can be a model of good, shared and needed work.  Fortunately, for a very short time, we have great help to stir people to help - the Rosies themselves.

Anne Montague is founding director of Thanks! Plain and Simple.

 


Grant and Funding Information


Lexus/Scholastic: Eco Challenge
The Lexus Eco Challenge, a program designed to inspire and empower middle and high school students to learn about the environment and take action to improve it.
Maximum Award: $30,000 in scholarships and grants.
Eligibility: middle and high school teams comprised of five to ten students and one teacher advisor.
Deadline: Challenge One (Land/Water) – September 24, 2012; Challenge Two (Air/Climate) – October 29, 2012.


P. Buckley Moss Foundation: Grants for Incorporation of the Arts
The P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children's Education makes grants for new or evolving programs that integrate the arts into educational programming. The purpose is to aid and support teachers who wish to establish an effective learning tool using the arts in teaching children who learn differently.
Maximum Award: $1,000.
Eligibility: programs for children K-12.
Deadline: September 30, 2012.


P. Buckley Moss Foundation: Grants for Teachers of Children Who Learn Differently
P. Buckley Moss Foundation Education Grants aid and support teachers who wish to establish an effective learning tool using the arts in teaching children with learning disabilities and other special needs. Maximum award: $1,000.
Eligibility: new or evolving programs that integrate the arts into educational programming.
Deadline: September 30, 2012.


Target: Field Trip Grants
Target Field Trip Grants are available to fund scholastic outings in situations where monies are otherwise lacking.
Maximum Award: $700.
Eligibility: teachers, principals, paraprofessionals and classified staff in K-12 public, private or charter school in the U.S.
Deadline: September 30, 2012.


Siemens/College Board: 2010 Siemens Competition
The Siemens Competition seeks to promote excellence by encouraging students to undertake individual or team research projects. It fosters intensive research that improves students' understanding of the value of scientific study and informs their consideration of future careers in these disciplines.
Maximum Award: $100,000.
Eligibility: high school students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents.
Deadline: October 1, 2012.


Lowe's: Toolbox for Education
Lowe's Toolbox for Education funds school improvement projects initiated by parents in recognition of the importance of parent involvement in education.
Maximum Award:$5,000.
Eligibility:K-12 schools (including charter, parochial, private, etc.) or parent groups (associated with a nonprofit K-12 school).
Deadline:October 12, 2012.


NEA Foundation: Learning & Leadership Grants
NEA Foundation Learning & Leadership Grants support public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of two purposes. Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences, such as summer institutes or action research; grants to groups fund collegial study, including study groups, action research, lesson study, or mentoring experiences for faculty or staff new to an assignment.
Maximum Award: $2,000 for individuals and $5,000 for groups engaged in collegial study.
Eligibility: public school teachers grades K-12; public school education support professionals; or faculty and staff at public higher education institutions.
Deadline: October 15, 2012.


NEA Foundation: Student Achievement Grants
The NEA Foundation Student Achievement Grants provide funds to improve the academic achievement of students by engaging in critical thinking and problem-solving that deepen knowledge of standards-based subject matter. The work should also improve students' habits of inquiry, self-directed learning, and critical reflection.
Maximum Award: $5,000.
Eligibility: practicing U.S. public school teachers, public school education support professionals, or faculty or staff at public higher education institutions.
Deadline: October 15, 2012.


Wild Ones: Lorrie Otto Seeds for Education Grant Program
The Lorrie Otto Seeds for Education Grant Program gives small monetary grants to schools, nature centers, or other non-profit educational organizations for the purpose of establishing outdoor learning centers. Funds will be provided only for the purchase of native plants and seed.
Eligibility: schools, nature centers, and other nonprofit and not-for-profit places of learning, including houses of worship.
Deadline: October 15, 2012.


U.S. Government: Fulbright Classroom Teacher Exchange Program
The Fulbright Classroom Teacher Exchange Program provides opportunities for teachers to participate in direct exchanges of positions with colleagues from other countries for a semester or academic year. By living and working in the cultures of their host countries, Fulbright teachers gain an understanding and appreciation of the similarities and differences in national cultures and education systems.
Maximum Award: year-long or semester-long direct exchange of teaching positions with a counterpart in another country teaching the same subject(s) at the same level.
Eligibility: full-time U.S. teachers.
Deadline: October 15, 2012.


Air Force Association: Educator Grant Program
The Air Force Association Educator Grant Program promotes aerospace education activities and encourages innovative aerospace activities within a prescribed curriculum. Each school year, the association awards grants to worthy projects that significantly influence student learning. The program also encourages establishing an active relationship between the school and the local Air Force Association organization.
Maximum Award:$250.
Eligibility:K-12 classrooms.
Deadline:October 17, 2012.


Clorox: Power a Bright Future Grants
Clorox Power a Bright Future Grants aim to provide necessary resources to help support school programs that enrich kids' lives.
Maximum Award: $50,000.
Eligibility: Anyone at least 18 years old at time of entry can nominate an accredited K-12, public or private school program.
Deadline: October 17, 2012.


AGI: A World of Change in My Community
The American Geological Institute is sponsoring a photography contest to celebrate Earth Science Week 2012. The photography theme for this year is "Earth Science is a Big Job."
Maximum Award: $300, a copy of AGI's Faces of Earth DVD, and winner's photograph on the Earth Science Week Website.
Eligibility: interested residents of the United States of any age.
Deadline: October 19, 2012.


AGI: Earth Science is a Big Job
The American Geological Institute is sponsoring a photography contest to celebrate Earth Science Week 2012. The photography theme for this year is "Earth Science is a Big Job."
Maximum Award:$300, a copy of AGI's Faces of Earth DVD, and winner's photograph on the Earth Science Week Website.
Eligibility:interested residents of the United States of any age.
Deadline:October 19, 2012.


CVS/Caremark: Community Grants
CVS/Caremark Community Grants are currently accepting proposals for programs, targeting children under age 21 with disabilities, which address health and rehabilitation services or enabling physical movement and play.
Maximum Award: $5,000.
Eligibility: non-profits located in states that also have CVS stores.
Deadline: October 31, 2012.


Mickelson/ExxonMobil: 2013 Teachers Academy
The Mickelson ExxonMobil 2013 Teachers Academy offers a program designed to provide third- through fifth-grade teachers with the knowledge and skills necessary to motivate students to pursue careers in science and math.
Maximum Award: all expenses paid five-day program in July 2013.
Eligibility: third- through fifth-grade teachers from all over the United States.
Deadline: October 31, 2013.


NGA/Subaru: Healthy Sprouts Awards
The National Gardening Association/Subaru Healthy Sprouts Awards recognize outstanding youth garden programs that teach about nutrition and the issue of hunger in the United States.
Maximum Award: $500 gift certificate to Gardener's Supply; NGA's Eat a Rainbow Kit, chock full of engaging taste education and nutrition lessons.
Eligibility: schools or organizations that plan to garden with children between the ages of 3 and 18.
Deadline: October 31, 2012.


FFVF: Leavey Awards for Excellence in Private Enterprise Education
The Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge Leavey Awards for Excellence in Private Enterprise Education honor outstanding educators who excite a commitment in their students to the free enterprise system and unleash the entrepreneurial skills of their students at the elementary, junior high school, high school, and college level.
Maximum Award: $15,000.
Eligibility: teachers at schools (K-12), colleges, and universities.
Deadline: November 1, 2012.


Freedom Foundation: Leavey Awards
The Leavey Awards for Excellence In Private Enterprise Education honor outstanding educators who excite a commitment in their students to the free enterprise system and unleash the entrepreneurial skills of their students at the elementary, junior high school, high school and college level.
Maximum Award: $15,000.
Eligibility: U.S. citizens or permanent residents employed full-time as an educator at an accredited American school (grades K-12), college or university.
Deadline: November 1, 2012.


IRA: Teacher as Researcher Grant
International Reading Association Teacher as Researcher grants support classroom teachers who undertake action research inquiries about literacy and instruction.
Maximum Award: $4,000.
Eligibility: All applicants must be members of the International Reading Association (IRA) and practicing pre-K-12 teachers with full time or permanent half time teaching responsibilities (includes librarians, Title I teachers, classroom teachers, and resource teachers). Classroom teachers will be given preference. Applicants may apply as a collaborative group or individually.
Deadline: November 1, 2012.


VFW: National Citizenship Education Teachers' Award
The VFW's National Citizenship Education Teachers' Award recognizes the nation's top elementary, junior high and high school teachers who teach citizenship education topics regularly and promote America's history and traditions.
Maximum Award: $1,000.
Eligibility: teachers K-12.
Deadline: November 1, 2012.


Nestlé USA: Very Best in Youth Program
The Nestlé USA Very Best in Youth Program honors young people ages 13 to 18 who have excelled in school and who are making their community and the world a better place.
Maximum Award: $1,000.
Eligibility: youth ages 13 and 18 years of age who demonstrate good citizenship, a strong academic record, and can show how they have made a special contribution to their school, church, or the community. Entrants must have permission from a parent or legal guardian to submit nomination.
Deadline: November 8, 2012.


NCTM: Improving Students' Understanding of Geometry Grants
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Improving Students' Understanding of Geometry grant is to develop activities that will enable students to better appreciate and understand some aspect of geometry that is consistent with the Principles and Standards for School Mathematics of NCTM. The project should include applications of geometry to, for example, art, literature, music, architecture, nature, or some other relevant area and may integrate the use of technology into the teaching of geometry. Proposals must address the following: geometry content, the appropriateness of the application, the link between the Geometry Standard and the project's activities, and the anticipated impact on students' learning.
Maximum Award: $4,000.
Eligibility: teachers preK-8 who are NCTM members as of October 15, 2012 or teach at a school with a preK-8 NCTM school membership as of October 15, 2012.
Deadline: November 9, 2012.


NCTM: Mathematics Course Work Scholarships for Grades PreK-5 Teachers
The National Council for the Teachers of Mathematics Course Work Scholarships for Grades PreK-5 Teachers provides financial support for improving teachers' understanding of mathematics by completing course work.
Maximum Award: $2,000.
Eligibility: individual classroom teachers or small groups of teachers currently teaching mathematics in grades PreK-5 level who are also (as of October 15, 2012) Full Individual or e-Members of NCTM or teach in a school with a current (as of October 15, 2012) NCTM PreK-8 school membership.
Deadline: November 9, 2012.


NCTM: PreK-6 Classroom Research Grants
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics PreK-6 Classroom Research Grants support and encourage classroom-based research in precollege mathematics education in collaboration with college or university mathematics educators. The research must be a significant collaborative effort involving a college or university mathematics educator (a mathematics education researcher or a teacher of mathematics learning, teaching, or curriculum) and one or more PreK-6 classroom teachers. The proposal may include, but is not restricted to, research on curriculum development and implementation, involvement of at-risk or minority students, students' thinking about a particular mathematics concept or set of concepts, connection of mathematics to other disciplines, focused learning and teaching of mathematics with embedded use of technology (any acquisition of equipment must support the proposed plan but not be the primary focus of the grant), and innovative assessment or evaluation strategies.
Maximum Award: $6,000.
Eligibility: classroom teachers currently teaching mathematics at the grades PreK-6 level who are current (as of October 15, 2012) NCTM members or who teach in a school that (as of October 15, 2012) has a NCTM PreK-8 school membership.
Deadline: November 9, 2012.


NCTM: Professional Development Grants for Grades PreK-5 Teachers
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Professional Development Grants for Grades PreK-5 Teachers support professional development to improve the competence in the teaching of mathematics of one or more classroom teachers.
Maximum Award: $3,000.
Eligibility: current (as of October 15, 2012) Full Individual or E-Members of NCTM or teachers at a school with a current (as of October 15, 2012) NCTM Pre-K8 school membership currently teaching at the grades PreK-5 level and with three or more years teaching experience.
Deadline: November 9, 2012.


NCTM: Using Mathematics to Teach Music
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Using Mathematics to Teach Music grant encourages the incorporation of music into the elementary school classroom to help young students learn mathematics. Any acquisition of equipment must support the proposed plan but not be the primary focus of the grant. Proposals must address the following: the combining of mathematics and music; the plan for improving students' learning of mathematics; and the anticipated impact on students' achievement. Maximum award: $3,000.
Eligibility: individual classroom teachers or small groups of teachers currently teaching mathematics in grades PreK-2 level who are also (as of October 15, 2012) Full Individual or e-Members of NCTM or teach in a school with a current (as of October 15, 2012) NCTM PreK-8 school membership.
Deadline: November 9, 2012.


Prudential: Spirit of Community Awards
The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards honor young people in grades 5 through 12 who have demonstrated exemplary voluntary service to their communities.
Maximum Award: $1,000 and a trip to Washington, D.C.
Eligibility: Students grades 5-12 who have conducted a volunteer service activity within the past year.
Deadline: November 13, 2012.


Delta Education/Frey-Neo/CPO Science: Awards for Excellence in Inquiry-based Science Teaching
The Delta Education/Frey-Neo/CPO Science Awards for Excellence in Inquiry-based Science Teaching will recognize and honor three (3) full-time PreK-12 teachers of science who successfully use inquiry-based science to enhance teaching and learning in their classroom.
Maximum Award: $1,500 towards expenses to attend the NSTA National Conference and $1,500 for the awardee.
Eligibility: PreK-12 teachers.
Deadline: November 30, 2012.


Humane Society of the United States: Education Mini-grant
The Humane Society of the United States is now accepting applications for the 2012 Humane Education Mini-Grant, designed to fund innovative humane education opportunities in K-12 classrooms.
Maximum Award: $1,000.
Eligibility: all certified K-12 teachers in the U.S.
Deadline: November 30, 2012.


NSTA: Awards for Excellence in Inquiry-based Science Teaching
The Delta Education/Frey-Neo/CPO Science Awards for Excellence in Inquiry-based Science Teaching will recognize and honor three full-time PreK-12 teachers of science who successfully use inquiry-based science to enhance teaching and learning in their classroom.
Maximum Award: $1,500 towards expenses to attend the NSTA National Conference, and $1,500 for the awardee.
Eligibility: PreK-12 teachers of science.
Deadline: November 30, 2012.


NSTA: DCAT Association "Making a Difference" Award
The Drug, Chemical & Associated Technologies Association "Making a Difference" Award recognizes excellence in a science program developed and implemented by middle- or high school-level science teachers, grades 6-12. Entries must show innovative and effective teaching strategies combined with a science program that has influenced students to explore and investigate science and its application to global problems.
Maximum Award: $2,500 to be used to enhance or expand the winning science program; the winning school's lead science teacher and principal will be awarded coach airfare and two nights' hotel accommodation to attend NSTA's National Conference.
Eligibility: innovative middle or high school science programs.
Deadline: November 30, 2012.


NSTA: Distinguished Fellow Award
The National Science Teachers Association Distinguished Fellow Award recognizes NSTA members who have made extraordinary contributions to science education through personal commitment to education, specifically science teaching or science; educational endeavors and original work that position recipients as exemplary leaders in their field; or significant contributions to the profession that reflect dedication to NSTA as well the entire educational community.
Maximum Award:recognition at the NSTA Awards Banquet in conjunction with the NSTA National Conference.
Eligibility:longstanding (at least 10 years) NSTA members.
Deadline:November 30, 2012.


NSTA: Distinguished Service to Science Education Award
The National Science Teachers Association Distinguished Service to Science Education Award recognizes those who, through active leadership and scholarly endeavor over a significant period of time, have made extraordinary contributions to the advancement of education in the sciences and science teaching.
Maximum Award: Formal citation, three nights' hotel accommodation, and up to $500 towards expenses to attend the NSTA National Conference.
Eligibility: NSTA members who have shown long-term dedication to science education.
Deadline: November 30, 2012.


NSTA: Wendell G. Mohling Outstanding Aerospace Educator Award
The Wendell G. Mohling Outstanding Aerospace Educator Award recognizes excellence in the field of aerospace education. The recipient of the award will be honored during the Awards Banquet and the Aerospace Educators Luncheon at the annual NSTA Conference.
Maximum Award: $3,000, and $2,000 in expenses to attend NSTA's National Conference.
Eligibility: educators in informal education settings (e.g., museums, government, science centers). Individuals must be nominated for this award; self-nominations accepted.
Deadline: November 30, 2012.


Vernier/NSTA: Technology Awards
The Vernier/NSTA Technology Awards promote the innovative use of data-collection technology using a computer, graphing calculator, or other handheld device in the science classroom. Maximum award: $1,000 in cash for the teacher, $1,000 in Vernier Products, and up to $1,000 toward expenses to attend the annual NSTA National Convention.
Eligibility: Current teachers of science in grades K-College.
Deadline: November 30, 2012.


AAPT: High School Physics Teachers Grants
American Association of Physics Teachers High School Physics Teachers Grants enables high school physics teachers to compete for small grants that will support innovative physics programs or activities that seek to increase student enrollment or to enhance student achievement in physics.
Maximum Award: $500.
Eligibility: High School Physics Teachers who are AAPT members.
Deadline: December 1, 2012.


Character Education Partnership: National Schools of Character Awards
The National Schools of Character Awards program has a twofold purpose: to identify exemplary schools and districts to serve as models for others; and to help schools and districts improve their efforts in effective character education.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: schools engaged in character education for a minimum of three full years, starting no later than December 2009. Districts need to have been engaged in character education for a minimum of four full years, starting no later than December 2008.
Deadline: December 3, 2012.


NGA/Home Depot: Youth Garden Grants
National Gardening Association Youth Garden Grants provide support to schools and community organizations with child-centered garden programs. In evaluating grant applications, priority will be given to programs that emphasize one or more of these elements: educational focus or curricular/program integration; nutrition or plant-to-food connections; environmental awareness/education; entrepreneurship; and social aspects of gardening such as leadership development, team building, community support, or service-learning.
Maximum Award: gift cards valued at $1,000 and educational materials from NGA.
Eligibility: schools, youth groups, community centers, camps, clubs, treatment facilities, and intergenerational groups throughout the United States.
Deadline: December 3, 2012.


AMA/Hesselbein Institute: AMA Scholarship
The American Management Association and the Hesselbein Institute Ambassador scholarship program is intended to assist social-sector nonprofit organizations in developing strong leadership. The scholarship is designed to provide nonprofit leaders with an opportunity to step out of the day-to-day, interact with peers across sectors, and develop practical skills they can apply immediately within their organizations.
Maximum Award: one-year scholarship.
Eligibility: employees of 501(c)(3) organizations with a minimum of three years of work experience in the social sector.
Deadline: December 15, 2012.


Libri Foundation: Books for Children
The Libri Foundation Books for Children Grants donate new, quality, hardcover children's books for small, rural, public libraries across the country.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: Libraries should be in a rural area, have a limited operating budget, and an active children's department. The average total operating budget of a Books for Children grant recipient must be less than $40,000.
Deadline: January 23, 2013.


AIAA Foundation: Grants for Excellence in Math, Science, Technology and Engineering
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Foundation Classroom Grants encourage excellence in educating students about math, science, technology, and engineering.
Eligibility: current AIAA Educator Associate or AIAA Professional members actively engaged as K-12 classroom educators.
Maximum Award: $200.
Deadline: rolling.


Access for Educators to C-SPAN Archival Footage
The C-SPAN Archives Grants awardees are granted the videotapes of their choice from the extensive collection in the C-SPAN Archives for creative proposals for using the network's programming in the classroom or in research projects.
Eligibility: middle and high school teachers, college/university professors.
Maximum Award: N/A.
Deadline: N/A.


Actuarial Foundation: Advancing Student Achievement Grants
The Actuarial Foundation Advancing Student Achievement grant program brings together actuaries and educators in local classrooms with the belief that interaction with real-world mentors will boost student interest and achievement in math. The Actuarial Foundation can provide a local network of actuaries ready to participate, as well as suggestions on how to integrate math concepts from the workplace into the classroom. Schools applying for grants will be given wide latitude in designing programs that enhance learning and create a "love of math" in each student.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: All schools willing to undertake a math-mentoring program involving local actuaries as volunteers are eligible. However, in order for a program to be viable, there must be a sufficient population of volunteer actuaries within easy traveling distance to make a regular program possible.
Deadline: None, but applications should be received at least one or two months prior to proposed start date.


AIAA Foundation: Grants for Excellence in Math, Science, Technology and Engineering
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Foundation Classroom Grants encourage excellence in educating students about math, science, technology, and engineering.
Eligibility: current AIAA Educator Associate or AIAA Professional members actively engaged as K-12 classroom educators.
Maximum Award: $200.
Deadline: rolling.


Allstate: Grants for National and Local Programs
The Allstate Foundation supports national and local programs for new partnerships that fit within its current focus areas of Teen Safe Driving and Economic Empowerment for Domestic Violence Survivors.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: 501(c)3 organizations.
Deadline: rolling.


Barnes and Noble Grants
Barnes and Noble booksellers is considering requests for grants from nonprofit organizations that focus on art, literacy, or education (K-12). Applicants must have a plan for promoting the grants program with Barnes and Noble and must be willing to work with the local stores on in-store programming.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: nonprofits that focus on art, literacy, or education (K-12).
Deadline: rolling.


Awards for Excellence in Educating Students About Math, Science, Technology & Engineering
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Foundation Classroom Grants are awarded to encourage excellence in educating students about math, science, technology, and engineering. Eligibility: current AIAA Educator Associate or AIAA Professional members actively engaged as K-12 classroom educators.
Maximum Award: $200.
Deadline: N/A.


Best Buy: Teach@15 Award
The Teach@15 Award program improves classroom learning by helping schools (grades 7-12) meet technology needs. A teen member (age 13-18) who is a registered member on www.at15.com can nominate his/her school to win a Teach@15 Award.
Maximum Award: $1,500 in the form of Best Buy Gift Cards.
Eligibility: accredited, nonprofit junior or senior public, private, parochial, magnet, and charter high schools in the U.S. serving any grades 7-12.
Deadline: ongoing.


Campbell's: Labels for Education
The Campbell's, Inc. Labels for Education Program gives schools free educational equipment in exchange for labels from Campbell products.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: Schools or parents coordinate label drives to raise resources for schools.
Deadline: N/A.


C-SPAN: Video Archive Grants
C-SPAN Archives Grants give teachers videotapes from the extensive collection in the C-SPAN Archives for creative proposals that use the network's programming in the classroom or in research projects.
Eligibility: middle and high school teachers and college/university professors.
Maximum Award: use of archive tapes.
Deadline: N/A.


Charles Lafitte Foundation: Grants Program
The Charles Lafitte Foundation Grants Program gives funds to groups and individuals to foster lasting improvement on the human condition by providing support to education, children's advocacy, medical research, and the arts.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: 501(c)3 institutions.
Deadline: rolling.


Comcast Grants for Diversity-Oriented Programs
The Comcast Foundation is awarding grants to maximize the impact of community investments so they yield tangible, measurable benefits to the neighborhoods Comcast serves and the people who live there. The Foundation's primary focus is in funding diversity-oriented programs that address literacy, volunteerism, and youth leadership development.
Maximum Award: $500,000.
Eligibility: 501(c)3 organizations operating within communities that Comcast serves.
Deadline: N/A.
For more information: http://www.comcast.com/foundation


Critical Exposure: Through Your Lens
The 21st Century School Fund, Critical Exposure, and Healthy Schools Campaign are inviting students, teachers, and everyone with a view of our nation's school buildings to show the world what you see every day at school: the good parts, the troubling parts, the things to be proud of, and the things to change. Contest launches February 1, 2011.


Do Something: Seed Grants
Do Something Seed Grants can be used towards project ideas and programs that are just getting started, or to jump-start programs and realize ideas for the first time. These grants can also be used towards projects that are already developed and sustainable, towards the next steps of the project and organization to help as the project expands.
Maximum Award: $500.
Eligibility: U.S. or Canadian citizens aged 25 or under.
Deadline: rolling.


Driver's Edge: Driving Instruction for Teens
Driver's Edge empowers young drivers through a combination of classroom discussions and behind-the-wheel defensive driving instruction to erase the "Fast and the Furious" and video-game mentality that many of today's young drivers have and that has skyrocketed automobile fatalities. The program is free.
Eligibility: students between the ages of 15 and 21 who have a learner's permit or driver's license.
Deadline: see tour schedule for relevant dates.


Earthwatch: Education Fellowships
The Earthwatch Institute offers educators fully funded fellowships for hands-on learning with leading scientists doing field research and conservation on one of 130 projects. Earthwatch's Education Fellowships are national in scope, and supported by a wide range of businesses, foundations, and individuals.
Maximum Award: full cost of expedition, including all research costs, meals, housing, on-site travel, etc.
Eligibility: K-12 classroom educators of any subject(s) from public or private schools nationwide.
Deadline: Applications accepted on a rolling basis throughout the spring.


ePals, Inc.: free In2Books curriculum
In2Books, the curriculum-based e-mentoring program from ePals, Inc., will be offered for free to some Title I schools. Students participating in In2Books select and read age-appropriate, high-quality books from a list compiled by a team of children's literature experts. The students are matched with carefully screened adult pen pals who read the same books as the students. After reading each book, students and their pen pals exchange thoughts about the important issues in the book via online letters. Teachers reinforce these activities in the classroom with related lessons and discussion.
Maximum Award: the online program, books and professional development (valued at more than $500).
Eligibility: all 3rd-5th grade classrooms in Title I schools from any one district.


Fund for Teachers: Grants
The Fund for Teachers provides funds for direct grants to teachers to support summer learning opportunities of their own design.
Maximum Award: $5,000.
Eligibility: teachers who work with students in grades pre-kindergarten through 12, with a minimum of three years teaching experience, full-time, spending at least 50 percent of the time in the classroom at the time grants are approved and made.
Deadline: varies by state.


Fund for Teachers: Grants for Travel and Growth
The Fund for Teachers makes direct grants to teachers for summer learning opportunities of their own design.
Maximum Award: $5,000.
Eligibility: teachers K-12 with a minimum of three years teaching experience; teachers must be full-time and spend at least 50 percent of the time in the classroom when grants are approved and made.
Deadline: varies by state.


Funding for Teachers to Bring Monarch Butterflies Into the Classroom
The Live Monarch Foundation Educator Outreach Program provides funding for teachers throughout the United States to enroll in the National Campaign to bring Monarch Butterflies into the classroom. This program provides education and materials to strengthen the Monarch's 3,000 mile migratory route within North America by creating self-sustaining butterfly gardens and refuges. Current extreme weather has eliminated early milkweed growth... participation is critical. Materials will be provided for each participant to raise a virtual butterfly and start a real butterfly garden with professional instruction on each level of its maintenance and care, with insight into the shared responsibility of each person to protect our fragile environment one backyard at a time.
Maximum Award: n/a.
Eligibility: teachers and classrooms in areas on the monarch migratory route.
Deadline: rolling.


Grants for Math Mentoring Programs Using Actuaries
The Actuarial Foundation Advancing Student Achievement Mentoring Program awards grants to schools and groups to develop a viable mentoring program involving actuaries in the teaching of mathematics to children in private and public schools. Collaboration among school systems, local actuarial clubs, corporations and other stakeholders in education is encouraged in order to enhance the chances of success, particularly on a long-term basis.
Maximum Award: $30,000.
Eligibility: All schools and groups willing to undertake a math mentoring program that involves local actuaries as volunteers.
Deadline: N/A.


Grants for Nonprofit Music Programs
The Guitar Center Music Foundation's mission is to aid nonprofit music programs across America that offer music instruction so that more people can experience the joys of making music.
Maximum Award: $5000.
Eligibility: 501(c)(3) organizations. Qualifying applicants are established, ongoing and sustainable music programs across the United States that provide music instruction for people of any age who would not otherwise have the opportunity to make music.
Deadline: N/A.


Grants to Support Education, Child Advocacy, Medical Research & the Arts
The Charles Lafitte Foundation Grants Program awards funds to help groups and individuals foster lasting improvement on the human condition by providing support to education, children's advocacy, medical research and the arts.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: 501c-3 institutions.
Deadline: n/a.


Grants for Early Literary Professionals
RA & RR Reading Conference Grants are available to help fund expenses for selected early literacy professionals attending International Reading Association or Reading Recovery conferences.
Maximum Award: $200.
Eligibility: early literacy professionals (grades K-3).
Deadline: N/A.


Grants for Foreign Language Training and International Studies
The U.S. Department of Education's International Education Programs Service (IEPS) offers funding to promote expertise and competence in foreign languages and area and international studies. The Group Projects Abroad Program supports overseas projects in training, research, and curriculum development in modern foreign languages and area studies by U.S. teachers, students, and faculty engaged in a common endeavor.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the United States and a faculty member in modern foreign languages or area studies; a teacher in an elementary or secondary school; or an experienced educator responsible for planning, conducting, or supervising programs in modern foreign languages or area studies at the elementary, secondary, or postsecondary levels.
Deadline: see website.


High Tech Camp for Girls
Microsoft DigiGirlz High Tech Camp for girls works to dispel stereotypes of the high-tech industry and gives young people a chance to experience firsthand what it is like to develop cutting-edge technology. During the camp, girls are exposed to executive speakers, technology tours and demonstrations, networking and hands-on learning workshops.
Maximum Award: camp attendance.
Eligibility: girls grades 7-12; must be 13 at the time of attendance.
Deadline: varies; see website.


Lockheed Martin: Grants for Education
Lockheed Martin provides grants for K-16 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education. This includes Lockheed Martin's K-12 STEM Education Initiative, Engineers in the Classroom, as well as STEM-focused curricular and extracurricular programs that provide employee engagement opportunities in a community in which Lockheed Martin has employees or business interests.
Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: 501(c)(3) organizations that deliver standards-based science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education to students in K-16.
Deadline: rolling.


MetLife/NASSP: National Principal of the Year
The MetLife/NASSP National Principal of the Year honors secondary school principals who have succeeded in providing high-quality learning opportunities for students as well as demonstrated exemplary contributions to the profession.
Maximum Award: $5,000.
Eligibility: any principal, headmaster, or leader of a public or private middle-level or high school from the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Department of Defense Education Activity, or the U.S. Department of State Office of Overseas Schools. Middle-level and high schools are defined as those containing some portion of grades 6 through 12; candidates must have served as a principal at one or more middle-level or high schools for three years or longer. Each candidate must be a principal or headmaster and member of NASSP and his or her state affiliate association at the time of selection as state principal of the year. For national finalists, these conditions must also be met at the time of national principal of the year interviews in August and at the national winner announcements in September.
Deadline: varies by state; see website.


Microsoft: DigiGirlz High Tech Camp
Microsoft DigiGirlz High Tech Camp for girls works to dispel stereotypes of the high-tech industry. During the camp session, girls listen to executive speakers, participate in technology tours and demonstrations, network, and learn through hands-on experience in workshops. This year camps will take place at various dates throughout the summer in Stonybrook, NY; Charlotte, NC; Fargo, ND; Redmond, WA; Las Colinas, TX; and St. Louis, MO.
Maximum Award: free attendance to camp.
Eligibility: girls grades 9-11 in the 2010-2011 school year and at least age 13 at time of application, with the exception of the Fargo, ND and Las Colinas, TX locations, where eligibility is restricted to grades 7-10 and 8-11, respectively.
Deadline: varies by location.


NAA: Young Publishers Program
The Newspaper Association of America Foundation Young Publishers program is designed to help high school students and advisers learn the skills required for success in newspaper publishing through the development of a business plan. To accomplish this, students and advisers must interact with and be mentored by volunteers from the local newspaper as the business plan is crafted.
Maximum Award: $2,500.
Eligibility: schools with a high proportion of minority students or located in and drawing its students from a rural area; must be able to demonstrate that its student newspaper is either struggling to exist or has ceased to exist.
Deadline: rolling; applications must be submitted at least five weeks before program is to begin.


NASSP/Virco: Assistant Principle of the Year
The NASSP/Virco National Assistant Principal of the Year program recognizes outstanding middle-level and high school assistant principals who have demonstrated success in leadership, curriculum, and personalization.
Maximum Award: $5,000.
Eligibility: any assistant principal or equivalent (e.g., vice principal, associate principal, or dean) of a public or private middle school or high school who has been in an assistant principalship at one or more middle-level or high schools for a minimum of two years and is a member of NASSP and their state affiliate association.
Deadline: varies by state; see website.


National Audubon Society: Pennies for the Planet
Pennies for the Planet helps young people get involved with conservation by taking part in local conservation action projects, and by collecting, saving, and sending in pennies for national and worldwide conservation projects. In this year's Pennies for the Planet campaign, students and their families can learn about three conservation projects around the U.S. that need help. Each Pennies project represents a conservation effort that will leave a legacy for future generations.
Maximum Award: National Audubon Society staff will visit prize-winning school to create a program about wildlife and wild places.
Eligibility: kids working in classrooms, clubs, Scout troops, other groups, and on their own.
Deadline: N/A.


Scholastic Lexus Environmental Challenge
The Scholastic Lexus Environmental Challenge program is designed to educate and empower students to take action to improve the environment. The program encourages middle and high school students to develop and implement environmental programs that positively impact their communities. Middle and high school teams comprised of 5 to 10 students and one teacher advisor are invited to participate in four initial challenges, each addressing a different environmental element -- land, water, air, and climate.
Maximum Award: $75,000.
Eligibility: students in grades 6-12 and their teachers.
Deadline: varies.


USGA/Alliance: Grants for the Good of the Game
The National Alliance for Accessible Golf (Alliance) and the United States Golf Association (USGA) believe that golf should be open to everyone and supports a wide variety of programs that create opportunities for individuals with disabilities to participate in the sport. They especially encourage inclusive programming- opportunities that allow participants with disabilities and participants without disabilities to learn and play the game side by side.
Maximum Award: $20,000.
Eligibility: tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations as defined under Section 501(c)3 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code or government entities such as public schools or municipalities.
Deadline: rolling.


VSP: Sight for Students
Sight for Students is a VSP charity that provides free vision exams and glasses to low-income, uninsured children. The program operates nationally through a network of community partners who identify children in need and VSP network doctors who provide the eyecare services. Parents and guardians interested in seeking assistance through the Sight for Students program must work through VSP's established network of community partners. VSP does not issue gift certificates directly to the public.
Eligibility: There are five basic qualifications a child must meet in order to receive a Sight for Students gift certificate: family income is no more than 200 percent of federal poverty level (see website for chart); child is not enrolled in Medicaid or other vision insurance; child is 18 years old or younger and has not graduated from high school; child or parent is a U.S. citizen or legal immigrant with a social security number; and child has not used the Sight for Students program during the past 12 months.
Deadline: N/A.